Feature Articles

By Daniel Wexel | July 2015

If a conversation should turn to travel, and I mention my penchant for hitchhiking, the reaction is always strong. Most people immediately worry aloud about how unsafe it must be. But even those in whom my irreverent travel stories have struck some chord of terror – once they’ve pushed beyond the horror show unfolding in their minds – are left gazing enviously down an open road of adventure and potential. Even as they insist they could never do it, their minds conjure up a Kerouac inflected image of a footloose and fancy free vagrant, plying the highways with all the...

By Travis Salway Hottes & Devon Haag with Mark Gilbert | May 2015

For the past few years we’ve been talking to gay and bisexual men in order to design a new STI and HIV testing service.1 We repeatedly heard concerns about the privacy of personal sexual health information and the desired convenience of getting a routine check-up every 3 to 6 months.

The former concern stems from the pervasive sexual stigma ingrained in the lives of gay and bi men. Understandably, gay and bi men don’t always feel comfortable disclosing their sexual orientation or sexual history to their family doctor, or even to nurses at the local STI clinic.

The latter concern...

By Craig Barron | April 2015

There was a river that ran through a small town in Southern Ontario. It led to a network of warm summer lakes. Behind a house on the outskirts there was a beautiful pasture; there are photos of a young adolescent boy surrounded by horses, completely at ease.

A brand new brick bunker up on a hill, my first high school, overlooked the lovely river. I knew the river view well because I usually sat gazing at it from behind the cafeteria's wall of picture windows. I’d have my fine lunch, alone: always fruit and something fresh-baked brought from home. An...

By Craig Barron | February 2015

As a 16 year old in 1969 what I mainly remember is being obsessed with a particular boy. I took no notice of the historic events like Stonewall, or just months before, the decriminalization of homosexual acts in Canada’s criminal code. The landscape as I saw it in a small Kawartha Lakes town, there were no homosexuals around and as a gay person I simply did not exist.

Then there were the 1970s and everything changed. The nascent growth of a gay sensibility, that same-sex love was healthy and natural. To be part of the change thousands of us would...

By Maggie MacAulay | January 2015

Participants attending the 10th Gay Men’s Health Summit spent two days discussing health literacy in areas such as sexual health, mental health, and cancer. Assessing and enhancing the health literacy of gay men, providers, and organizations was a common theme. Of chief concern was the impact of new technologies on gay men’s sexual health: How should we change the way we talk about HIV in light of the shifting landscape of prevention and care? What role does emerging digital technologies play? These were two questions I had in mind as I listened and observed.

Increased emphasis on biomedical technologies...

By Maggie MacAulay | October 2014
Maggie MacAulay

This year’s CBRC Summit theme was about health literacy: “the ability to access, comprehend, evaluate and communicate information—as a way to promote, maintain and improve health— in a variety of settings, across the life-course”. According to PHAC, an estimated 55% of working age adults and 88% of adults over 65 have less than adequate health literacy.

Poor health literacy often translates to poor health outcomes and is usually correlated with a range of other social determinants such as stigma, poverty, and racism. So, does it make more sense to target literacy or the social factors?

Existing research about health literacy...

By Travis Salway Hottes | September 2014

The recent social media outpouring in response to Robin Williams’ suicide reminded me of a similar spate of media attention to suicide several years ago. In the fall of 2010, four gay teenagers from across the US killed themselves—all within a few weeks—after facing relentless harassment and bullying at their respective schools. (1) I remember feeling a visceral connection to their distress. One of them lived in a small town in Indiana, just across the state border from my hometown. His death affected me more profoundly than Williams’. I could imagine all too well what he experienced at school and...

By Keith Reynolds | May 2014

A long time ago in a place far, far away...

I never saw myself staying in my hometown, Ladner, when I grew up. Like my childhood hero, Luke Skywalker, I was raised on a farm, needed a haircut, and desperately wanted out. While Luke went on to save the galaxy with the help of some sassy droids and his besties, I just needed to get...

By Keith Reynolds | February 2014

I'm going to be a father.

Do I have your attention? I guess I should clarify, one day I'd like to be a father, maybe. Before my friends, family, and followers start squealing with delight there are a few things I'd like to clear up. Firstly, I don't need baby names because I will be choosing some from the approved list in the gay agenda. I was thinking Letitia, Dolphin or perhaps Charlie (pronounced Claire). Secondly, I don't think it will be happening anytime soon. So hold off on buying those baby booties, but maybe start putting some money away...

By Keith Reynolds | November 2013

"So, is it different being married?"

When people ask, I usually say, "Yes, now I have decent appliances!" Or, “Sure! This extra debt is very rewarding.” Or better yet, “Absolutely, now we can claim our cat as a dependant.” It's easier to say something snide since I still don't really have a thoughtful or heartfelt answer to this — at least none that I'll admit to.

My husband and I are constantly peppered with that question from the Marrieds and Unmarrieds alike. I get it, my husband and I are freaking adorable, we deserve to be studied. Married people will...

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